Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Matthew Bumpus

Matthew Bumpus

ASSOC PROF, HUM DEV 509-335-3816 Spokane

Curriculum Vitae (pdf)

Education/Training

  • Ph.D. Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University, 2000
  • M.S. Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University, 1997
  • B.A. Psychology/Elementary Education, Whitworth College, 1990

Professional Experience

2009-Present
Associate Professor, Department of Human Development, Washington State University

2003-2008
Assistant Professor, Department of Human Development, Washington State University

2000-2003
Assistant Professor, Child Development Program, California State University – Chico

1990-1995
Fourth grade teacher, Mead (WA) School District

Recent Grant Funding

2019-2021: Adaptation of substance use prevention program for parents of first-generation Latinx students. National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health. Principal Investigator: L.G. Hill. Role: Co-Investigator.

2016-2021: A randomized trial of “Letting Go and Staying Connected”, an interactive parenting intervention to reduce risky behaviors among students transitioning to college. National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health. R01DA039247. Principal Investigator: L.G. Hill. Role: Co-Investigator.

2016-2021: Student success through transformational change: Creating connection to values and purpose. Washington State University. Principal Investigators: L.G. Hill, S. Swindell, D. Yost. Role: Co-Investigator.

2016-2018: Parental notification following student substance use violations. WSU Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program pilot grant. Principal Investigator: M. Bumpus.

Research Interests

Work and family, especially concerning linkages between work-related stress and family processes; mother-child and father-child relationships; parental monitoring/knowledge; social development during middle childhood and adolescence.

Selected Publications

Bayly, B.L.+, & Bumpus, M.F. (in press). Predictors and implications of values clarity among first-year college students. College Student Journal.

Jeffords, J.R., Bayly, B.R., Bumpus, M.F., & Hill, L.G. (in press). Investigating the associations among university students’ psychological flexibility and self-efficacy. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory, and Practice.

Cooper, B.R., Weybright, E.H., Bumpus, M.F., Hill, L.G., & Agley, J. (2018). Exploring alcohol use motivations in underage college students: Contributions of a person-centered analytic approach. Emerging Adulthood, 6(6), 387-398.

Weybright, E.H., Cooper, B.R., Beckmeyer, J., Bumpus, M.F., Hill, L.G., & Agley, J. (2016). Moving beyond drinking to have a good time: A person-centered approach to identifying reason typologies in legal-aged college drinkers. Prevention Science, 17, 679-688.

Gagnon, R.J., & Bumpus, M.F. (2016). Fidelity and its importance to experiential and outdoor education. Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership, 8(1).

Weybright, E.H., Cooper, B.R., Beckmeyer, J., Bumpus, M.F., Hill, L.G., & Agley, J. (2016). Moving beyond drinking to have a good time: A person-centered approach to identifying reason typologies in legal-aged college student drinkers. Prevention Science, 17, 679-688.

Gagnon, R.J., Franz, N., Garst, B.A., & Bumpus, M.F. (2015). Factors impacting program delivery: The importance of implementation research in extension. Journal of Human Sciences and Extension, 3, 68-82.

Ullrich-French, S.C., Cox, A.E., & Bumpus, M.F. (2013). Physical activity motivation and behavior across the transition to university. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 2(2), 90-101.

Yam, K.C., Bumpus, M.F., & Hill, L.G. (2012). Motivating effort: A theoretical synthesis of the self-sufficiency and two-market theories. British Journal of Social Psychology, 51(4), 709-716.

Werner, N.E., Bumpus, M.F., & Rock, D. (2010). Involvement in Internet aggression during early adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 39(6), 607-619.

Bumpus, M.F., & Rodgers, K.B. (2009). Parental knowledge and its sources: Exploring the moderating roles of family structure and race. Journal of Family Issues, 30(10), 1356-1378.

Bumpus, M.F., & Werner, N.E. (2009). Maternal rule-setting for children’s Internet use. Marriage and Family Review, 45(6-8), 845-865.

Bumpus, M.F., & Hill, L.G., (2008). Secrecy and parent-child communication during middle childhood: Associations with parental knowledge and child adjustment. Parenting: Science and Practice, 8(2), 93-116.

Bumpus, M.F., Crouter, A.C., & McHale, S.M. (2006). Linkages between negative work-to-family spillover and mothers’ and fathers’ knowledge of their young adolescents’ daily lives. Journal of Early Adolescence, 26(1), 36-59.

Crouter, A.C., Bumpus, M.F., Davis, K.D., & McHale, S.M. (2005). How do parents learn about adolescents’ experiences? Implications for parental knowledge and adolescent risky behavior. Child Development, 76(4), 869-882.

Bumpus, M.F. (2004). Family and work, In K. Christensen & D. Levinson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Community. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Bordin, J., Bumpus, M.F., & Hunt, S. (2003). Every 15 minutes: A preliminary evaluation of a school-based drinking/driving prevention program. California Journal of Health Promotion, 1(3), 1-6.

Crouter, A.C., Head, M.R., Bumpus, M.F., & McHale, S.M. (2001). Household chores: Under what conditions do mothers lean on daughters? in A. Fuligni (Ed.), Family assistance and obligation during adolescene. (New Directions in Child Development Monograph). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bumpus, M.F., Crouter, A.C., & McHale, S.M. (2001). Parental autonomy-granting during adolescence: Exploring gender differences in context. Developmental Psychology, 37(2), 163-173.

Crouter, A.C., & Bumpus, M.F., (2001). Linking parents’ work stress to child and adolescent psychological adjustment. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 10(8), 156-159.

Crouter, A.C., Bumpus, M.F., Head, M.R., & McHale, S.M. (2001). Implications of overwork and overload for the quality of men’s family relationships. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 63(2), 404-416.

 

 

 

Washington State University